Brand Monitoring and Text Mining Saved by the New Science of Consumer Perceptions and Interaction Outcomes

The brand intermediaries throw a curve ball while the early users of today’s immature text mining services are non-plussed.

Although I’m generally classified as a self-employed ‘business analyst’, my sub specialty is the critical review of technology-based product and services strategies. It’s been a problem getting the recruiter corps to wrap around my specialty, and I have to, by necessity, do my own marketing and outreach. Word of mouth, satisfied clients, and blog articles all help. I dwell on this because my latest madcap idea to re-focus brand monitoring as a decision support web hosted service for brand intermediaries toward the mid-market, and away from the brand owners, had stirred some ire in the industry.

“What do you know? What are your credentials? How did you come to this conclusion? What a conflagration.

Just because you put the word, ‘analyst’, after your name on a business card, does that make currency of your surmises and adjudications in themselves valuable? Of course not. Unless you carry the dubious distinction of working for the de facto pimps of the analyst industry – Gartner, Forrester, Giga, etc – you have to analyze and find the kernel of truth that is non-obvious, and oftentimes disruptive to the status quo and common beliefs¬† prevailing in the industry. Don’t get me wrong, I use the word pimps advisedly and gingerly; while these august agencies turn out a lot of paid for whore crap, you can’t beat their non-commissioned, self-sponsored reports and quantitative research that no lone-wolf analyst can match.

What do I know? Nothing special – I just try and call it as I see it. I have had a relatively undistinguished technology career with a few notable home runs. I write well, I express myself clearly, I can outline why I come to my conclusions and methods that led to those surmises and adjudications. I never graduated university, although I have one of the best interdisciplinary skill sets covering hardware and actual software systems and standards. This was all accidental, fate intervened.

What makes someone retain a bozo like me and say, ‘study this sector, look at what we are doing, or are proposing to do, and make a critical review’. Moi? Yes, moi. If a client has internal technical leadership calling a product play, I can be a cheap insurance policy to get some critical perspective on the pitfalls, or a clear headed referee for the go-ahead. Since I am not in the management or review chain, and my engagement is closed ended, I am no threat and my advice has often been disregarded. That’s my twinkle. I continue to get work because I more often than not catch a critical issue that was missed by those with an emotional or political attachment to a product or strategy or R&D path. It may be a mess when the client is in the midst of upheaval, but people go to other jobs and remember the good advice Wilensky¬† gave them back at old company X. The institutional investors and VC’s have been good to me, too. Continue reading